"Evidence", by Rae Armantrout

On Sundays crowds would comb through thrift shops
stunned by all that had been, evidently, intended


   *

The ceramic seal,
head craned to stare
at a geranium
protruding from its back.

"The Evolution of Meaning," by Kate Greenstreet

Rae Armantrout + Kate Greenstreet

Rae Armantrout’s most recent books, Versed, Money Shot, Just Saying, Itself, Partly: New and Selected Poems, and Entanglements (a chapbook selection of poems in conversation with physics), were published by Wesleyan University Press. In 2010 her book Versed won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and The National Book Critics Circle Award. Armantrout was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2007. Reviewing Partly in The London Review of Books, Stephen Burt describes Armantrout’s poems like this: “Replete with double and triple meanings, they describe chess moves and human institutions, computer code and dating rituals… Such multiple meanings, which occupy the foreground of her poems, lurk behind all human interactions, casting doubt on everything we intend.” Her poems have appeared in many anthologies and journals including Poetry, Lana Turner, The Nation, The New Yorker, Bomb, The Paris Review, Postmodern American Poetry: a Norton Anthology, The New Anthology of American Poetry (Rutgers), The Open Door: 100 Poems, 100 Years of Poetry Magazine (Scribners), and several editions of the yearly anthology, The Best American Poetry (Scribners). Her books have been translated in Spanish, French, Italian, and German editions. She is recently retired from UC San Diego where she was professor of poetry and poetics. While at UCSD she co-taught a course called Poetry for Physicists with physicist Brian Keating. She currently lives in the Seattle area.

Kate Greenstreet's new book is The End of Something.

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